Is “Active Engagement” the Key Characteristic of Effective Teaching?

On this Labor Day, remember that schools are founded in the people who work there.  A 2013 Gallup Survey found that:

Seven in 10 American workers are “not engaged” or are “actively disengaged” in their jobs, are “emotionally disconnected” from their workplaces, and are “less likely to be productive,” according to Gallup’s recently released study, “State of the American Workplace.”

Are you sure that your school bucks this overwhelming statistic? How do you know that your teachers, those who are the front-line role model for students, are “actively engaged” in their own work and the work of the school? Because they come to work and do not cause trouble? Because they don’t question the status quo? Because their classes are well-organized and their students do not get cited for discipline issues?  How do you define and measure engagement?

What is the relationship between engaged and effective educators?  Is there a better measure of our success in a school than “active engagement” in the processes of personal and professional development and how those transfer to the learning experience?

One thought on “Is “Active Engagement” the Key Characteristic of Effective Teaching?

  1. Angel Kytle

    Grant,
    I would combine active engagement, active connection/relationships, and active reflection as three KEY ingredients in effectiveness as they focus us in on vital actions and mindsets that should be distinguishing our schools from others. In addition, I think these are the three main things that can not be “replaced” by alternate ways of “doing” school. These are the things I look for when searching for excellence and when searching for cultures either with whom I would want to associate or from whom I desire to learn.

    Reply

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